Connect with us

Health

Men’s brains diminish faster than women’s says study

Published

on

While the human brain tends to shrink with age, men’s brains diminish faster than women’s which may explain why the fairer sex are more likely to stay mentally sharp in their later years, finds a study led by a researcher of Indian-origin.

The study noted that the brain’s metabolism slows as people grow older, but it may differ between men and women.

The findings, led by researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, showed that women’s brains appear to be about three years younger than men of the same chronological age, metabolically speaking.
Image result for Men's brains diminish faster than women's
“It’s not that men’s brains age faster — they start adulthood about three years older than women, and that persists throughout life,” said Manu Goyal, Assistant Professor of radiology at the university’s Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology.

“What we don’t know is what it means. I think this could mean that the reason women don’t experience as much cognitive decline in later years is because their brains are effectively younger, and we’re currently working on a study to confirm that,” he explained.

Older women tend to score better than men of the same age on tests of reason, memory and problem solving.
Image result for Men's brains diminish faster than women's
The results were published in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The brain runs on sugar, but how the brain uses sugar changes as people age.

To figure out how brains use sugar differently between men and women, the team analysed 121 women and 84 men, ranging in age from 20 to 82 years.

The researchers trained a machine-learning algorithm on men’s age and their brain metabolism, taken from PET scans by measuring the flow of oxygen and glucose in their brains, and applied it to women’s.
Image result for Men's brains diminish faster than women's
The algorithm yielded brain ages an average of 3.8 years younger than the women’s chronological ages.

The researchers also performed the analysis in reverse. This time, the algorithm reported that men’s brains were 2.4 years older than their true ages.

The relative youthfulness of women’s brains was detectable even among the youngest participants, who were in their 20s, the researchers said.

Feature

Rare genetic brain disease reported, ‘Myoclonus-Dystonia’

Published

on

By

Bangalore: A rare genetic brain disease causing a movement disorder has been reported from Mumbai where a 21-year-old patient has been diagnosed with ‘Myoclonus-Dystonia’ with facial, neck and hand shaking and jerking due to rare genetic disorder called ADCY5-related dyskinesia.

This is a rare disease with less than 400 cases reported all over the world. The disorder is known to cause abnormal involuntary tremors in the body and is usually seen in children, but this is the first time it has been reported in an Indian adult patient.

He suffered from the condition since he was 13, but these jerks were initially mild. This progressed to moderate severity over the last few years. “We were able to manage the trembling till the time they were mild. With time, the intensity increased and so did the frequency which hampered daily activities and even any work that needed concentration”, told the parents of the 21 year old.

Dr VL Ramprasad, COO, MedGenome Labs that performed the genetic testing said, “ADCY5 mutation causes abnormal involuntary movements affecting the neck, arms and face. This mutation can also lead to episodic worsening triggered by anxiety, stress or inactivity -or characteristically periods before or after sleep. We have now published this case in MDCP (Movement Disorders Clinical Practice), which is a well-known journal.”

The doctor informed that when the patient came to them he would get these movements in spells intermittently in the early years. His whole body was shaking when he was anxious or even concentrating on an activity. After initial tests the doctors were convinced that he had a rare genetic disorder and tests confirmed ADCY5 gene mutation

Continue Reading

Trending