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Trauma in children may up stomach disorders later

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If your child is suffering from trauma or extreme psychosocial deprivation, then s/he is at risk of developing stomach issues later which could affect the brain and behaviour, finds a new study.

The study found that children with past caregiving disruptions showed higher levels of symptoms, including stomach aches, constipation, vomiting and nausea.

In addition, they had distinctly different gut microbiomes from those raised with biological caregivers from birth, said the study published in the journal Development and Psychopathology.

Children raised by parents had increased gut microbiome diversity, which is linked to the prefrontal cortex — a region of the brain known to help regulate emotions.
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“One common reason children show up at doctors’ offices is intestinal complaints. Our findings indicate that gastrointestinal symptoms in young children could be a red flag to primary care physicians for future emotional health problems,” said Nim Tottenham, Professor Columbia University in the US.

“Our study is among the first to link disruption of a child’s gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity with brain activity in regions associated with emotional health,” said Bridget Callaghan, postdoctoral candidate at the varsity.

For the study, 115 children adopted from orphanages or foster care homes on or before approximately they were two years old and 229 children raised by a biological caregiver were analysed.

“It is too early to say anything conclusive, but our study indicates that adversity-associated changes in the gut microbiome are related to brain function, including differences in the regions of the brain associated with emotional processing,” said Tottenham.

Although more research is needed, this study helps to fill in an important gap in the literature, the team noted.

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China coronavirus toll reaches 908, 40,171 infected

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Beijing: The death toll due to the novel coronavirus in China on Monday increased to 908, with 40,171 confirmed cases, the country’s National Health Commission said.

Until midnight, 6,484 severe cases had been recorded while 3,281 people, who had recovered from the illness, had been discharged, Efe news reported citing the Commission as saying.

As of now, 399,487 patients in close contact with the infected have been traced, out of which 187,518 are under observation, according to the Chinese agency.

Among those under observation, 23,589 were suspected of having contracted the virus.

The latest figures indicate an increase of 97 deaths over the previous day – when 632 people were also discharged – and 3,062 new infections.

Of the 97 deaths, 91 were recorded in Hubei province, whose capital is Wuhan – the epicentre of the outbreak -, and which has been under de facto quarantine since January 23.

It total, 2,618 of the 3,062 new coronavirus cases have been detected in Hubei.

Until now, all deaths but one – which occurred in the Philippines – have been in China, which accounts for about 99 per cent of those infected, although about 20 countries have confirmed cases.

The virus has already claimed more lives than the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in 2003.

Despite both the novel coronavirus and SARS originating in China, the geographical distribution of deaths is radically different.

SARS emerged in the southern Guangzhou province, while the coronavirus appears to have originated from a seafood market in the central-eastern city of Wuhan.

With SARS, 349 people died in mainland China, 299 in Hong Kong, 43 in Canada, 37 in Taiwan and 33 in Singapore, to mention only the most affected places, according to the figures from WHO.

Coronavirus has spread to at least 27 other countries and territories.

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