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Trauma in children may up stomach disorders later

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If your child is suffering from trauma or extreme psychosocial deprivation, then s/he is at risk of developing stomach issues later which could affect the brain and behaviour, finds a new study.

The study found that children with past caregiving disruptions showed higher levels of symptoms, including stomach aches, constipation, vomiting and nausea.

In addition, they had distinctly different gut microbiomes from those raised with biological caregivers from birth, said the study published in the journal Development and Psychopathology.

Children raised by parents had increased gut microbiome diversity, which is linked to the prefrontal cortex — a region of the brain known to help regulate emotions.
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“One common reason children show up at doctors’ offices is intestinal complaints. Our findings indicate that gastrointestinal symptoms in young children could be a red flag to primary care physicians for future emotional health problems,” said Nim Tottenham, Professor Columbia University in the US.

“Our study is among the first to link disruption of a child’s gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity with brain activity in regions associated with emotional health,” said Bridget Callaghan, postdoctoral candidate at the varsity.

For the study, 115 children adopted from orphanages or foster care homes on or before approximately they were two years old and 229 children raised by a biological caregiver were analysed.

“It is too early to say anything conclusive, but our study indicates that adversity-associated changes in the gut microbiome are related to brain function, including differences in the regions of the brain associated with emotional processing,” said Tottenham.

Although more research is needed, this study helps to fill in an important gap in the literature, the team noted.

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Rare genetic brain disease reported, ‘Myoclonus-Dystonia’

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Bangalore: A rare genetic brain disease causing a movement disorder has been reported from Mumbai where a 21-year-old patient has been diagnosed with ‘Myoclonus-Dystonia’ with facial, neck and hand shaking and jerking due to rare genetic disorder called ADCY5-related dyskinesia.

This is a rare disease with less than 400 cases reported all over the world. The disorder is known to cause abnormal involuntary tremors in the body and is usually seen in children, but this is the first time it has been reported in an Indian adult patient.

He suffered from the condition since he was 13, but these jerks were initially mild. This progressed to moderate severity over the last few years. “We were able to manage the trembling till the time they were mild. With time, the intensity increased and so did the frequency which hampered daily activities and even any work that needed concentration”, told the parents of the 21 year old.

Dr VL Ramprasad, COO, MedGenome Labs that performed the genetic testing said, “ADCY5 mutation causes abnormal involuntary movements affecting the neck, arms and face. This mutation can also lead to episodic worsening triggered by anxiety, stress or inactivity -or characteristically periods before or after sleep. We have now published this case in MDCP (Movement Disorders Clinical Practice), which is a well-known journal.”

The doctor informed that when the patient came to them he would get these movements in spells intermittently in the early years. His whole body was shaking when he was anxious or even concentrating on an activity. After initial tests the doctors were convinced that he had a rare genetic disorder and tests confirmed ADCY5 gene mutation

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