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High-fat diet in elderly linked to heart disease, diabetes

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Elderly people, who consume a high-fat diet rich in Omega-6 fatty acids, could be at risk of developing health issues ranging from diabetes to heart failure, researchers, including one Indian-origin, said in a study.

The study conducted on a mice model showed that a calorie-dense, obesity-generating diet in ageing mice disrupted the composition of the gut microbiome.
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Young mice, who were fed an obesity-generating diet were able to resolve inflammation after a heart attack, even though their gut microflora had already been altered by the diet.

In contrast, in aged mice fed the obesity-generating diet, the heart attack triggered nonresolving inflammation — associated with heart failure.
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The study, published in FASEB Journal, investigated how ageing and omega 6-enriched diet impact microflora in the gut, the structure and function of the spleen (abdominal organ), and a subsequent immune response to heart attack.

“This study highlights that diet and age are critical factors that have differential impact with age, and it highlights the spleen and heart as an inter-organ communication system with the immune defence system,” said Ganesh Halade, Associate Professor at the University of Alabama.

The team found that obesity-generating diet increased the proportion of neutrophils in the blood of aged-mice.

Higher neutrophil counts means that you have an infection or are under a lot of stress.

The obesity-generating diet in eldery also led to structural deformities in mice spleens.

The spleen, a secondary immune organ, is a known reservoir for leukocytes that move to the heart to begin tissue repair and help resolve inflammation in case of an heart attack.

Corona

No guarantee any Covid vaccine in development will work: WHO Chief

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World Health Organisation (WHO) chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has said that the top health organisation has no guarantee whether any single Covid-19 vaccine now in development will work.

While addressing a virtual press conference, the WHO chief said: “We have no guarantee that any single vaccine now in development will work.”

“The more candidates we test, the higher the chance we will have of a safe and efficacious vaccine,” he added.

According to the WHO, almost 200 vaccines for Covid-19 are currently in clinical and pre-clinical testing.

“The history of vaccine development tells us that some will fail, and some will succeed,” Ghebreyesus said.

Also, the WHO, in collaboration with global vaccine alliance group Gavi and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), has launched a scheme COVAX.

The aim of the collaboration is to accelerate the development of Covid-19 vaccines and enable equitable access for every country in the world.

The COVAX Facility enables governments to spread the risk of vaccine development and ensure their populations can have early access to effective vaccines.

Even more importantly, the COVAX Facility is the mechanism that will enable a globally-coordinated rollout for the greatest possible impact.

The facility will help to bring the pandemic under control, save lives, accelerate economic recovery and ensure that the race for vaccines is a collaboration, not a contest, according to the WHO chief.

“The fastest route to ending the pandemic and accelerating the global economic recovery is to ensure some people are vaccinated in all countries, not all people in some countries,” he noted.

 

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