Connect with us

Feature

Lethal bomb explosion hits Baghdad amid Anti-Government protest

Published

on

Baghdad: A lethal bomb blast has exploded in central Baghdad, the hub of anti-government protests which have gripped Iraq for weeks, as clashes between demonstrators and Iraqi safety forces resumed.

At least six people were killed and around 30 others suffered injuries when a bomb placed under a vehicle detonated near Tahrir Square in downtown Baghdad blast.

The blast, which happened at night, targeted a crowded area in al-Tayaran Square, an Iraqi Interior Ministry official told Xinhua news agency on conditions of anonymity.

It was the very first these incident in the cash due to the fact the demonstrations began in early October, even though it was not quickly very clear no matter if the explosion close to Tayaran Sq. and Tahrir Square specific the protesters.

Protesters had repeatedly regrouped from under clouds of tear gas as they fought to tear down a concrete wall blocking access to Khilani Square.

Security forces erected the barrier to keep the demonstrations from crossing a bridge that leads to the fortified Green Zone, which houses government buildings and foreign embassies.

The clashes come as rights teams condemned using extreme pressure by police and safety forces when coping with peaceable demonstrators, in addition to medical employees and ambulances.

Since October 1, Iraqis have been pouring onto the streets of Baghdad and southern cities to protest in opposition to corruption and the federal government’s failure to ship fundamental companies and financial alternatives.

The protesters’ calls for have since widened to incorporate the resignation of the federal government and a full overhaul of the nation’s political system, which was established after a US-led invasion that critics say has allowed sure people and teams to counterpoint themselves and increase their affect.

A minimum of 320 folks have died since October 1 with greater than 15,000 wounded through the protests, in line with the Iraqi Parliament human rights fee.

Feature

Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

Published

on

By

New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

Continue Reading

Trending