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Mi Band 3i with 2 monochrome display launched in India

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Xiaomi has launched the successor of the Mi Band HRX today — Mi Smart Band 3i. Xiaomi’s new wearable follows the popular Mi Band 4 and is available for pre-order starting today via mi.com

The Mi Band 3i brings in some key upgrades. The Mi Band 3i comes in a single Black colour set and it also comes with a 0.78 inch screen at 128 x 80 pixels. The screen is also a monochrome White AMOLED display with 300 nits of brightness and a capacitive touch panel. It also comes equipped with a 110mAh li-polymer battery. Xiaomi claims that this battery will power the Mi Band 3i for up to 20 days. The Mi Band 3i comes with support for Bluetooth v4.2 and is compatible with phones running on Android 4.4 and iOS 9.0 and above. The strap is said to be manufactured using TPU material, and the Mi Band 3i is also listed as 5ATM water resistant certified.

Talking about fitness features, it can track number of steps taken, distance walked, calories burned and more. You can also see app notifications right on the band’s display. These include WhatsApp, Instagram, Text Messages, and incoming call alerts. There is a new “Find Device” option which lets you find the smartphone that is paired with the band. The Mi Band 3i also comes with 5ATM (50 meters) certification for water and dust resistance. Sadly, there is no support for heart rate monitoring.

The new fitness band from Xiaomi will be available for Rs 1,299. You can pre-order it from the company website, and shipping starts from December 10.

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Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

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New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

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