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Kohli breaks another record in the victory side

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Port of Spain: India captain Virat Kohli on Sunday surpassed Pakistan great Javed Miandad to become the highest run-scorer against the West Indies in ODI cricket. Virat needed 19 runs before the start of the second ODI against the West Indies here to surpass Miandad’s tally of 1,930 runs against the two-time World Cup winners.

Miandad played his last ODI against the Windies in 1993. Miandad took 64 innings to reach his tally while Kohli has taken just 34 innings to surpass that. India won the second ODI against West Indies from 59 runs by DLS method. Virat Kohli played a astonishing knock of 120 runs and thereby marked his 42nd century.

The 32 year old skipper has eclipsed former captain Sourav Ganguly to become the second highest run-getter for India in one-day internationals. Kohli achieved the feat during the second ODI against West Indies when he hit Jason Holder for a boundary in the 32nd over. It was his first century from March which gave India a win against the Windies by 59 runs.

Saurav Gaunguly tweeted and applauded Kohli for his world class knock saying “Virat Kohli another master class in one day cricket @imVkohli @BCCI.What a player,” Overall, Kohli is in the eighth spot in the list of highest run-scorer in ODIs. Now Kohli is just short of 7 centuries from breaking the master blaster Sachin Tendulker’s of 49 centuries. Kohli played his first ODI against West Indies in the 2009 Champions Trophy in Johannesburg in which he scored an unbeaten 79. His first hundred against the West Indies came in 2011 in Visakhapatnam.

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Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

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New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

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