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Brother of Paris attacks suspect speaks to press

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Brussels: The brother of two of the suspects in the Paris attacks, who was freed from police custody without any charge, has said he had noticed “absolutely nothing” different about his brothers — one of whom died in a suicide bombing and the other is on the run.

“I was in no way linked to what happened on Friday in Paris, from near or far,” quoted Mohamed Abdeslam as saying outside his home in Molenbeek, Brussels, on Monday.

Abdeslam’s brother Brahim carried out a suicide bombing in Paris on Friday. His other brother, Salah, is the subject of an international arrest warrant.

Asked where he was on Friday night, Abdeslam replied: “I have an alibi all evening.”

His lawyer, Nathalie Gallant, said her client was in Belgian city of Liege on Friday evening with a business partner, with whom he is working on the renovation of a lounge bar. She said telephone records confirmed his presence there.

Abdeslam said: “We are an open family. We have never had a problem with the law. My parents are in shock and have not fully come to terms with what has happened.”

He added that he had noticed “absolutely nothing” different about his two brothers. As for the whereabouts of his brother Salah, he told reporters: “We do not know where he is. We do not know if he dares to surrender himself or not.”

“My family and I are moved by what happened. We found out about it in the same way as many of you. We did not think for one moment that one of my brothers was linked to the attacks. We were thinking of the victims and their families,” he said.

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Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

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New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

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