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J&K: Farooq Abdullah appears before ED again in JCKA money laundering case.

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Farooq Abdullah, the former Chief Minister of Jammu and Kashmir, was questioned by the ED for nearly six hours. Abdullah said after questioning on Monday that he was not worried and would cooperate in the investigation.

National Conference President Farooq Abdullah appeared before the Enforcement Directorate (ED) for the second time in a week. He was produced for questioning in the Jammu and Kashmir Cricket Association (JKCA) in the alleged scam and money laundering of crores of rupees.

On October 19, the 83-year-old Abdullah, the former Chief Minister of Jammu and Kashmir, was questioned by the ED for nearly six hours. Abdullah said after questioning on Monday that he was not worried and would cooperate in the investigation.

The last inquiry was four days after the meeting of mainstream parties including the National Conference of J&K and the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) at Abdullah’s house and the decision to form an alliance for the ‘Gupkar Declaration’.

ED officials said Abdullah’s statement would be recorded under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act (PMLA). He was first questioned in Chandigarh in July last year. The ED is believed to be questioning Abdullah about his role. And judgment during the alleged fraud in the association as the JKCA president.

The ED has registered the case based on an FIR lodged by the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI). The CBI has accused JKCA office bearers including General Secretary Mohammad Salim Khan and former Treasurer Ahsan Ahmad Mirza.

In 2018, the CBI filed a charge sheet against Abdullah, Khan, Mirza and former JKCA treasurer Mir Manzoor Ghaznafar Ali. Former accountants Bashir Ahmad Misgar and Gulzar Ahmed Baig for alleged misappropriation of about Rs 43.69 crore in JKCA funds. The amount was allocated by the Board of Cricket in India (BCCI) between 2002 and 2011 to encourage cricket in the state.

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SC moved against UP, Uttarakhand’s ‘love jihad’ laws

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A plea has been moved in the Supreme Court challenging the The Uttar Pradesh Prohibition of Unlawful Conversion Of Religion Ordinance, 2020 and the Uttarakhand Freedom Of Religion Act, 2018.

The plea moved by advocates Vishal Thakre and Abhay Singh Yadav and law researcher Pranvesh, states that the UP ordinance disturbs the basic structure of the Constitution. “The most important issue was whether the Parliament has the power to amend the fundamental rights enshrined under Part III of the Constitution,” said the plea.

The petitioners contended that the Parliament has no power to amend the fundamental rights, and if this ordinance is implemented, it will harm public at a large and will create a chaotic situation in the society.

“It is also pertinent to mention herein that the ordinance is passed by the state government/s of Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand is against the provisions of Special Marriage Act, 1954 and it will create fear in the society who is/ are not part of Love Jihad… they can be falsely implicated in the ordinance,” the plea said.

Citing the landmark Kesavananda Bharti case, the plea said “the court held that the Parliament can amend the Constitution but the Parliament cannot change the basic structure of the Constitution”.

The petitioners contended they are aggrieved by the ordinances passed by the state governments and prayed before the top court that the law passed by Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand should be declared ultra vires and null and void, as they “disturb the basic structure of the Constitution and also are against the public policy and society at large”.

“This ordinance can become a potent tool in the hands of bad elements of the society to use this ordinance to falsely implicate anyone,” it argued, adding that there are probabilities of “falsely implicating persons who are not involved in any such acts and it will be a grave injustice if this ordinance is passed”.

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