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Facebook launches meme-making app ‘Whale’

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California: Facebook is far from giving up on younger demographics; that’s become abundantly clear. It wants to become cool with young users in some way, and is constantly trying new things – whether that’s launching new apps every few months or so, or testing new features in its flagship app, Instagram, WhatsApp, or Messenger.

One of those apps above is Whale, a new Meme Creator app from a group within Facebook called NPE Team LLC. NPE stands for New Product Experimentation, by the way.

The Whale app is NPE’s new experimental app that has been launched only in Canada for now, as per Apptopia – cited by The Information. The free-to-use app doesn’t have any hidden subscription pricing, and allows you to use a wide variety of editing tools for creating a meme. Users can snap a real-time photo, choose from their camera roll, or browse through the library of stock images. They can then add creative text, emojis, filters, and popular effects to make the meme more contextual and humorous. These creations can then be saved and shared on social media, or message threads.

Features inside the app include two-grid- three-grid, four-grid, or blank canvas layouts, a freeform draw tool, emojis and customisable sticker options, and effects like laser eyes, vortex, bulge, and more

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Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

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New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

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