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Greta Thunberg declines environmental prize

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Greta Thunberg, the teen activist who has inspired millions to strike for action on climate change, doesn’t want awards. She wants people to listen to science.

The 16-year-old Swede declined an environmental prize worth $52,000 the Nordic Council, a regional inter-parliamentary organization, awarded her.

“I want to thank the Nordic Council for this award. It is a huge honour. But the climate movement does not need any more awards,” she wrote in an Instagram post on Tuesday. “What we need is for our politicians and the people in power (to) start to listen to the current, best available science.”

Thunberg, who is in California for the Youth Climate Strike in Los Angeles, also criticized Nordic countries, which “have the possibility to do the most. And yet our countries still basically do nothing.”

The president of the Nordic Council, Hans Wallmark, said in a statement that he respected Thunberg’s decision and that the council will think carefully about what to do with the prize money.

It was not the first prize that the climate activist has won or been nominated for.

Three Norwegian lawmakers nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize this year because they believe “the massive movement Greta has set in motion is a very important peace contribution.”

Last year, about three months into her school climate strike campaign, Thunberg declined another award the Children’s Climate Prize, which is awarded by a Swedish electricity company because many of the finalists had to fly to Stockholm for the ceremony.

Thunberg notes that flights contribute to global warming, so she sailed across the Atlantic Ocean for two weeks on a zero-emissions sailboat to reach New York. There the Swede scolded a U.N. climate conference in September, repeatedly asking, “How dare you?”

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Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

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New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

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