Connect with us

Feature

Kapil Dev resigns as head of cricket advisory body after conflict charges

Published

on

New Delhi: Former India captain, Kapil Dev, who was the chairman of the Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC) has stepped down from the role. Top officials in the Board of Control dor Cricket in India (BCCI) has confirmed to Sportstar India’s 1983 World Cup-winning captain has sent his resignation to Committee of Administrators (CoA) chief Vinod Rai and BCCI CEO, Rahul Johri.

Kapil Dev resigned as the chief of the CAC days after Shanta Rangaswamy stepped down from the 3-member committee. Kapil did not reveal the reason for his resignation but wrote an email to the Supreme Court-appointed Committee of Administrators (CoA), informing them about his decision.

“It was a pleasure to be part of the Ad-Hoc CAC to specifically select the Head Coach for the Men’s Cricket Team. I hereby tender my resignation from the same with immediate effect,” The Indian Express quoted Kapil Dev writing an email to BCCI CEO Rahul Johri and CoA head Vinod Rai.

The former Indian captain’s decision to resign from the CAC comes after the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) Ethics Officer D.K. Jain sent a notice to the panel comprising of Kapil, Anshuman Gaekwad and Shantha Rangaswamy with regards to allegations of conflict of interest as claimed by MPCA life member Sanjeev Gupta.

Kapil Dev was appointed the chief of the ad-hoc committee formed in July 2019. The CAC was tasked with the role of picking the head coaches of India women’s and men’s cricket teams. Kapil-led CAC had conducted interviews and re-appointed Ravi Shastri as head coach of Virat Kohli-led senior national team.

Feature

Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

Published

on

By

New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

Continue Reading

Trending