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Facebook might start hiding ‘Like’ counts for posts to ease social pressure

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Facebook on Tuesday confirmed it is dabbling with no longer making a public display of how many “likes” are racked up by posts.
Such a change could ease pressure to win approval with images, videos or comments and, instead, get people to simply focus on what is in posts.
Facebook-owned Instagram earlier this year announced it was testing hiding like counts and video view tallies in more than a half-dozen countries, with account holders still able to see the numbers but masking amounts from others.
“We are considering hiding like counts from Facebook,” a spokesman for the leading social network told AFP on Tuesday.
Twitter has also experimented with hiding numbers of times tweets were “liked” or “retweeted,” according to product lead Kayvon Beykpour.
Twitter found that people engaged less with tweets when they couldn’t see the counts.
“When you remove engagement indicators, people engage less,” Beykpour said while briefing journalists at Twitter headquarters in San Francisco last month.

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Apple App Store : Avast warns of 3 ‘fleeceware’ apps

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Avast said its researchers installed the three apps and successfully purchased subscriptions to each app. However, when they tried to use the VPNs, the apps only provided subscription options again.

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The apps are available on the Apple App Store as Beetle VPN, Buckler VPN, and Hat VPN Pro, Avast said.

These three apps have been downloaded over 420K, 271K, and 96K times, respectively, between April 2019 and May 2020, according to data from Sensor Tower, a mobile apps marketing intelligence and insights company.

“Fleeceware apps fall into a gray area, because they are not malicious per se, they simply charge users absurd amounts of money for weekly, monthly or yearly subscriptions for features that should be offered at much lower costs,” Nikolaos Chrysaidos, Head of Mobile Threats & Security at Avast, said in a statement.

The apps” all have high ratings, ranging from 4.6 to 4.8, and include enthusiastic reviews, all similarly written, which Avast considers may potentially be fake.

Avast said its researchers installed the three apps and successfully purchased subscriptions to each app. However, when they tried to use the VPNs, the apps only provided subscription options again.

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