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Hurricane Dorian aims for US, causes limited damage in Caribbean

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PUERTO RICO — Hurricane Dorian caused limited damage in the northern Caribbean as it left the region Wednesday night, setting its sights on the U.S. mainland as it threatened to grow into a dangerous Category 3 storm.

Power outages and flooding were reported across the U.S. Virgin Islands, the British Virgin Islands and the Puerto Rican islands of Vieques and Culebra after Dorian hit St. Thomas as a Category 1 storm.

Meanwhile, Dorian caused an island-wide blackout in St. Thomas and St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands, and scattered power outages in St. Croix, government spokesman Richard Motta told AP. In addition, the storm downed trees and at least one electric post in St. Thomas, he said, adding that there were no reports of major flooding. “We are grateful that it wasn’t a stronger storm,” he said.

There were no immediate reports of damage in the British Virgin Islands, where Gov. Augustus Jaspert said crews were already clearing roads and inspecting infrastructure by late Wednesday afternoon.

Dorian had prompted U.S. President Donald Trump to declare a state of emergency Tuesday night and order federal assistance for local authorities.

At 11 p.m. EDT, Dorian was centered about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Juan. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said its maximum sustained winds had increased to 85 mph (140 kph) as the storm moved northwest at 13 mph (20 kph).

The Hurricane Center said the storm could grow into a dangerous Category 3 storm as it pushes northwest in the general direction of Florida. Dennis Feltgen, a Hurricane Center meteorologist in Miami, said Dorian may grow in size and could land anywhere from South Florida to South Carolina on Sunday or Monday.

However, Puerto Rico seemed to be spared any heavy wind and rain, a huge relief too many on an island where blue tarps still cover some 30,000 homes nearly two years after Hurricane Maria. The island’s 3.2 million inhabitants also depend on an unstable power grid that remains prone to outages since it was destroyed by Maria, a Category 4 storm.

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Apple App Store : Avast warns of 3 ‘fleeceware’ apps

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Avast said its researchers installed the three apps and successfully purchased subscriptions to each app. However, when they tried to use the VPNs, the apps only provided subscription options again.

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The apps are available on the Apple App Store as Beetle VPN, Buckler VPN, and Hat VPN Pro, Avast said.

These three apps have been downloaded over 420K, 271K, and 96K times, respectively, between April 2019 and May 2020, according to data from Sensor Tower, a mobile apps marketing intelligence and insights company.

“Fleeceware apps fall into a gray area, because they are not malicious per se, they simply charge users absurd amounts of money for weekly, monthly or yearly subscriptions for features that should be offered at much lower costs,” Nikolaos Chrysaidos, Head of Mobile Threats & Security at Avast, said in a statement.

The apps” all have high ratings, ranging from 4.6 to 4.8, and include enthusiastic reviews, all similarly written, which Avast considers may potentially be fake.

Avast said its researchers installed the three apps and successfully purchased subscriptions to each app. However, when they tried to use the VPNs, the apps only provided subscription options again.

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