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Skipping breakfast may increase death risk

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Do you skip your morning meal and eat dinner late at night? If so, it may increase the risk of death and other heart-related problems, researchers have warned.

The findings, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, suggest that people with such an unhealthy lifestyle had a four to five times higher likelihood of early death and increased chances of a second heart attack.

“Our research shows that the two eating behaviours are independently linked with poorer outcomes after a heart attack but having a cluster of bad habits will only make things worse,” said co-author Marcos Minicucci, from Sao Paolo State University in Brazil.
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“We also think that the inflammatory response, oxidative stress, and endothelial function could be involved in the association between unhealthy eating behaviours and cardiovascular outcomes,” he added.

For the study, the team involved 113 patients with a mean age of 60, of which 73 per cent were men. The study enrolled patients with a particularly serious form of heart attack called ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).

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According to the team, this was the first study to evaluate these unhealthy behaviours in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Skipping breakfast was observed in 58 per cent patients, having late night dinner in 51 per cent, and both behaviours in 41 per cent.

To improve eating habits, researchers recommended a minimum two hour interval between dinner and bedtime.

“A good breakfast is usually composed of dairy products (fat-free or low fat milk, yogurt and cheese), a carbohydrate (whole wheat bread, bagels, cereals), and whole fruits,” the team said.

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Rare genetic brain disease reported, ‘Myoclonus-Dystonia’

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Bangalore: A rare genetic brain disease causing a movement disorder has been reported from Mumbai where a 21-year-old patient has been diagnosed with ‘Myoclonus-Dystonia’ with facial, neck and hand shaking and jerking due to rare genetic disorder called ADCY5-related dyskinesia.

This is a rare disease with less than 400 cases reported all over the world. The disorder is known to cause abnormal involuntary tremors in the body and is usually seen in children, but this is the first time it has been reported in an Indian adult patient.

He suffered from the condition since he was 13, but these jerks were initially mild. This progressed to moderate severity over the last few years. “We were able to manage the trembling till the time they were mild. With time, the intensity increased and so did the frequency which hampered daily activities and even any work that needed concentration”, told the parents of the 21 year old.

Dr VL Ramprasad, COO, MedGenome Labs that performed the genetic testing said, “ADCY5 mutation causes abnormal involuntary movements affecting the neck, arms and face. This mutation can also lead to episodic worsening triggered by anxiety, stress or inactivity -or characteristically periods before or after sleep. We have now published this case in MDCP (Movement Disorders Clinical Practice), which is a well-known journal.”

The doctor informed that when the patient came to them he would get these movements in spells intermittently in the early years. His whole body was shaking when he was anxious or even concentrating on an activity. After initial tests the doctors were convinced that he had a rare genetic disorder and tests confirmed ADCY5 gene mutation

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