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Sleep Natural : End Sleepless Nights With These Natural Insomnia Tips

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It’s not just the right sleepwear that plays an important role to experience uninterrupted sleep, bedtime is also the perfect instance to take immense care of your luscious locks and skin and to rejuvenate from the harm caused by the pollution around you.

Jagadeesh.P, Trainer, Paul Mitchell India, and Karan Behal, CEO and Founder of PrettySecrets, have a few recommendations for a healthy sleep.

*It is important to keep your scalp hydrated with anything that is soothing and provides proper nourishment. An overnight treatment is very effective for damage control for those of you who witness overly dry hair or split ends on a regular basis. A nourishing treatment and a satin soft pillow case will ensure you wake up like a diva each morning.

* For easing the tension before you sleep, tying your hair in a loose bun or braiding it is an advisable option.

 

* Massaging your scalp on a regular basis with tea tree oil stimulates the blood circulation which leads to healthy growth and helps in relieving tension. This gives the nourishment it requires. Gently massaging your hair helps you to achieve a sound sleep.

* You must also pick easy clothing to slide in for a relaxed sleep. Bid adieu to the tight clothing on the body. It is also preferable to choose breathable fabric while sleeping. Achieving that cotton comfort in cute pajamas, stylish night dresses, cozy robes and more allows air circulation to your skin and is perfect for a cozy sleep.

* You can also redefine your sleepwear with stylish and comfortable nightwear varieties that helps you get some much-needed shut-eye. Satin fabric clothing will also keep you warm on the colder nights. You can opt for a whole lot of colourful and printed chemise, PJ’s, and wraps that will not disappoint you.

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* If you are the to-be bride, depending on your personality you can opt from the honeymoon collection to add to your bridal trousseau. Opt for the right fit that matches your silhouette to get the sexiest best on your wedding night.

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Study reveals kidney disease or injury is associated with much higher risk of mortality for COVID-19 patients

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Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found that there is much higher risk of mortality faced by COVID-19 patients in intensive care, who have chronic kidney disease (CKD), or those who develop new (acute) kidney injury (AKI).

CKD is a type of kidney disease in which kidney function declines over a period of months to years, and is more common in older people.

AKI is an abrupt loss of kidney function that takes place over seven days or less and can have several causes, including the damage and inflammation caused by the COVID-19 virus itself.

“To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of outcomes in critically unwell COVID-19 patients in the UK with kidney failure, particularly in patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease,” said study author Sanooj Soni from Imperial College London in the UK.

For the study, published in the journal Anaesthesia, the research team examined the association between AKI and CKD with clinical outcomes in 372 patients with COVID-19 admitted to four regional intensive care units (ICUs) in the UK.

The average age of the patients was around 60 years, and 72 percent of them were male.

A total of 216 (58 percent) patients had some form of kidney impairment (45 percent developed AKI during their ICU stay, while 13 percent had pre-existing CKD), while 42 percent had no CKD or AKI.

The patients who developed AKI had no history of serious kidney disease before their ICU admission, suggesting that the AKI was directly related to their COVID-19 infection.

The authors found that patients with no kidney injury or disease had a mortality of 21 percent.

Those with new-onset AKI caused by the COVID-19 virus had a mortality of 48 percent, whilst for those with pre-existing CKD (Stages 1-4) mortality was 50 percent.

In those patients with end-stage kidney failure (CKD stage 5), where they already required regular out-patient dialysis, mortality was 47 percent.

Mortality was greatest in those patients with kidney transplants, with six out of seven patients (86 percent) dying, highlighting that these patients are an extremely vulnerable group.

The investigators also examined the rates of renal replacement therapy, a form of hospital dialysis, due to COVID-19 in these ICU patients with kidney injury.

Out of 216 patients with any form of kidney impairment, 56 per cent of patients requiring renal replacement therapy, the researchers said.

The authors noted that mortality in patients with end-stage kidney failure and on dialysis, who normally have worse outcomes in many other diseases, was similar to that in patients with less severe kidney disease and Covid-19 associated AKI.

This finding may suggest that such patients benefit equally from ICU admission and thus the threshold for admission should be calibrated accordingly in any future COVID-19 surge.

“Our data demonstrate that kidney disease and failure in critically ill patients with COVID-19 are common, and associated with high mortality,” the authors noted.

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