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History again created by India after electronic intelligence satellite Emisat puts into orbit by ISRO

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Emisat, DRDO, ISRO, PSLV C 45, PSLV, Indian Space Research Organisation, Defence Research and Development Organisation, Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, Electronic intelligence satellite, Defence satellite, Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh, National news, Science and Technology news

Sriharikota: The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on Monday put into orbit the Emisat, an electronic intelligence satellite for the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) in a copy book style.

The notable aspects of this space mission were the flying of a new variant of the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV); switching off and on the fourth stage engine couple of times; and the use of the fourth stage as an orbital platform carrying three experimental payloads.

At 9.27 a.m., the PSLV rocket standing at 44.5 metres tall and weighing about 239 tonne with a one-way ticket, hurtled itself towards the skies ferrying the Emisat and 28 international customer satellites — 24 from the US, two from Lithuania and one each from Spain and Switzerland.

 

Emisat, DRDO, ISRO, PSLV C 45, PSLV, Indian Space Research Organisation, Defence Research and Development Organisation, Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, Electronic intelligence satellite, Defence satellite, Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh, National news, Science and Technology news

 

With the fierce orange flame at its tail lighting, the rocket slowly gathered speed and went up enthralling the people at the rocket port while the rocket’s engine noise like a rolling thunder adding to the thrill.

“It is a special mission for us. We will be using a PSLV rocket with four strap-on motors. Further, for the first time we will be trying to orbit the rocket at three different altitudes,” ISRO Chairman K. Sivan had earlier told media persons.

The PSLV is a four-stage engine expendable rocket with alternating solid and liquid fuel.

 

Emisat, DRDO, ISRO, PSLV C 45, PSLV, Indian Space Research Organisation, Defence Research and Development Organisation, Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, Electronic intelligence satellite, Defence satellite, Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh, National news, Science and Technology news

 

In its normal configuration, the rocket will have six strap-on motors hugging it’s first stage.

On January 24, the ISRO flew a PSLV with two strap-on motors while in March, it had four strap-on motors.

The space agency also has two more PSLV variants — Core Alone (without any strap-on motors) and the larger PSLV-XL.

The ISRO selects the kind of rocket to be used based on the weight of satellites it carries.

 

India again creates history by putting defence satellite Emisat into orbit with electronic intelligence:

 

Even though ISRO has done this earlier, it was more thrilling to note the rocket’s fourth stage/engine was cut/switched off.

More thrilling aspect came in when rocket’s fourth stage/engine was cut/switched off in just over 16 minutes after the lift off.

Forty seven seconds later, the Emisat was ejected at an altitude of about 753 km.

 

Emisat, DRDO, ISRO, PSLV C 45, PSLV, Indian Space Research Organisation, Defence Research and Development Organisation, Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, Electronic intelligence satellite, Defence satellite, Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh, National news, Science and Technology news

 

“There is increased demand for satellites from strategic sectors. About six/seven satellites are planned to be built,” a senior official told media persons on the condition of anonymity.

India will also be launching two more defence satellites sometime in July or August with its new rocket Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV).

Meanwhile, at about 60 minutes after the PSLV’s lift-off, its fourth stage will be restarted and run for about 10 seconds before it will be cut off again.

At about 108 minutes after the lift off, the rocket’s fourth stage will again restarted for few seconds before it will be again cut off.

 

Emisat, DRDO, ISRO, PSLV C 45, PSLV, Indian Space Research Organisation, Defence Research and Development Organisation, Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, Electronic intelligence satellite, Defence satellite, Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh, National news, Science and Technology news

 

Finally, at about 110 minutes after the rocket left the earth, the first of the 28 foreign satellites will be ejected and in five minutes all other satellites will be ejected.

Again the fourth stage will be restarted and stopped twice to bring its altitude to 507 km at the end of three hours after the lift off.

At this point the fourth stage will turn into an orbital platform for three experimental payloads: (a) Automatic Identification System (AIS) from ISRO for Maritime satellite applications capturing messages transmitted from ships (b) Automatic Packet Repeating System (APRS) from AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation), India – to assist amateur radio operators in tracking and monitoring position data and (c) Advanced Retarding Potential Analyser for Ionospheric Studies (ARIS) from Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology (IIST) – for the structural and compositional studies of ionosphere, the space agency said.

 

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Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

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New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

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