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Banned Australia skipper Steve Smith eyes comeback in 2019 ICC World Cup

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Steve Smith, Former Australian skipper, ICC World Cup, Cricket World Cup, Cricket news, Sports news

Melbourne: Banned for a year for his role in the ball tampering scandal earlier this year, former Australia skipper Steve Smith is eyeing a return to the side as the Kangaroos prepare to defend their title at the upcoming 50-over ICC World Cup in England and Wales next year.

With Smith’s ban slated to end in March 2019, the 29-year-old is focussed on putting the next three months to good use and has been playing club cricket for Sutherland.

 

Steve Smith, Former Australian skipper, ICC World Cup, Cricket World Cup, Cricket news, Sports news

 

“At the moment I am pretty content with where I am at,” Smith was quoted as saying by the International Cricket Council (ICC) website.

“We’ll see what the future will hold. The next three months is about just preparing as well as I can to hopefully be a part of the World Cup and the Ashes,” he added.

Smith also heaped praises on his successor Tim Paine for guiding the Australians to a fantastic win over India in the second Test at Perth — their first since the first Test of the four-match series in South Africa, in Durban.

 

Former Australia skipper Steve Smith eyes to comeback for Kangaroo in World Cup:

 

In between, the Australians lost the last two Tests on that tour of South Africa, lost the two-match Test series in the UAE and then lost the opening Test at home against India in Adelaide.

“Tim Paine has done an exceptional job and (so has) Aaron Finch taking over the one-day side,” Smith said.

 

Steve Smith, Former Australian skipper, ICC World Cup, Cricket World Cup, Cricket news, Sports news

 

“He’s had a tough start to that with the performances of the team. If I get back and play under them I will do everything I can to help them out and help Australia have success.”

“It’s been tough at times, particularly when the boys haven’t played their best in a couple of games and it’s been hard watching and not knowing I can go out and help them,” Smith added.

 

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Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

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New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

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