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Lenovo owned Motorola launches Moto G6 Plus for Rs 22,499 in India

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Moto G6 Plus, Lenovo, Motorola, Amazon India, Moto Hubs, Paytm Mall, Camera technology, Mobile and Smartphones, Gadget news, Technology news

New Delhi: Lenovo-owned Motorola on Monday launched Moto G6 Plus with latest camera technology and fast-charging feature in India for Rs 22,499.

Powered by a 2.2 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 630 chipset, the smartphone houses 6GB RAM and 64GB internal memory that can be expanded up to 256GB.

 

Moto G6 Plus, Lenovo, Motorola, Amazon India, Moto Hubs, Paytm Mall, Camera technology, Mobile and Smartphones, Gadget news, Technology news

 

“Featuring a 3D glass back, the Moto G6 Plus features a 12MP+5MP dual rear cameras with dual autofocus pixel technology and smart camera software such as spot colour, selective b&w, face unlock and QR code scanner,” the company said in a statement.

It also has Google Lens integrated into the camera software for seamless object and landmark recognition.

The 16MP front camera comes with features like group selfie, beautification, manual mode, time lapse and slow motion video recording.

 

Motorola launches Moto G6 Plus with fast-charging feature in India for Rs 22,499:

 

The smartphone comes with 5.9-inch full HD+ max vision display with 18:9 aspect ratio and integrated Dolby Audio preset modes.

The phone is fueled by a 3200mAh battery and a “TurboPower” 15w charger has been provided in the box.

 

Moto G6 Plus, Lenovo, Motorola, Amazon India, Moto Hubs, Paytm Mall, Camera technology, Mobile and Smartphones, Gadget news, Technology news

 

Moto G6 Plus is available on Amazon India, Moto Hubs, and Motorola’s offline retail partners in indigo black colour.

Launch offers for Paytm Mall users include Rs 3,000 cashback for purchases made using the app, while Jio users will get a cash back of Rs 4,450 on recharges of Rs 198 and Rs 299.

 

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Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

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New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

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