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Muslim woman openly takes “khula” (divorce) from her husband

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Muslim woman, Divorce, Talaq, Khula, Husband, Shajada Khatoon, Juber Ali, Lucknow, Regional news

Lucknow: A Muslim woman has openly announced to take “khula” (divorce) from her husband after her efforts to get it done through Islamic seminaries did not succeed.

In Islam, a man can take “talaq”, while a woman can part ways with her husband through “khula”.

 

 

Shajada Khatoon, married to Juber Ali, signed a letter for “khula” at a press conference here yesterday.

“I tried to take ‘khula’ from my husband. I had approached the Islamic seminaries, Nadwa and Firangi Mahal, but did not get any relief,” she claimed.

“That is why, I am signing the ‘khula’ in the public and sending him (the husband) the notice. I am free from him now,” she said.

 

Muslim woman gives ‘divorce’ to husband at press meet in Lucknow:

 

Muslim Women League general secretary Naish Hasan, who helped Shajada take “khula”, said the woman was fed up with her husband torturing her and had been living separately for the last 18 months.

All India Muslim Personal Law Board executive member Maulana Khalid Rashid Farangi Mahali, however, said the process followed by the woman for “khula” was not correct.

 

 

“Khula is not done in a single letter. For khula, the woman has to serve a notice on her husband and if he does not respond to three of such notices, it is deemed implemented,” he said.

Asked about the cleric’s stand, Hasan said if he felt that Shajada was wrong, he should approach the court.

 

 

All India Muslim Women Personal Law Board President Shaista Ambar voiced support for the woman, saying what she did was “valid”.

The incident comes at a time when the country is witnessing a raging debate over the issue of triple talaq.

 

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Nasa finds Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram with help of Indian engineer

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New York: NASA has found the crash site and debris of India’s Chandrayaan-2 Vikram moon lander following a tip from an Indian space enthusiast who examined pictures of the area of the moon taken by a US orbiting camera.

The site was located by Shanmuga Subramanian, who on his own scoured the pictures taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbital Camera (LROC), NASA and Arizona State University announced on Monday confirming the find.

The first mosaic image of the likely crash site made from pictures taken by the LROC on September 17 was downloaded by several people to look for signs of the Vikram, NASA said.

One of them, Subramanian, contacted the LROC project with a positive identification of debris, it said.

Arizona State University (ASU), where the LROC project is located, said: “After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images.”

When the images for the first mosaic were acquired on September 17, the impact point was poorly illuminated and could not easily be identified, it said.

But two image sequences were acquired on October 14 and 15, and on November 11 were better.

The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2×2 pixels and casts a one pixel shadow.

The university said that based on Subramanian’s tip, the LROC team scoured the surrounding area in the new mosaics and found the impact site and the debris field.

The impact site is located at 70.8810 degree S, 22.7840 degrees E, at an elevation of 834 metres, it said.

“The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 metres northwest of the main crash site,” ASU said.

Vikram lost contact with the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) following its launch from Chandraayan-2 moon orbiter on September 6 when it tried to make a softlanding near the moon’s south pole.

In a statement NASA said: “Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement.”

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